Tag Archives: the book of Isaiah

“Seek the Lord while he may be found; call on him while he is near.”  (Isaiah 55:6, NIV)

God is omnipresent, yet, there are times when we feel closer to Him, and He seems more accessible than at other times.

When we are not pressed by circumstances, or stressed by the sense that things are out of control; it is in such mundane moments that we need to draw near to God.

Use the “boring” level stretches of time to cement your relationship to your heavenly Father.  Hunting for divine companionship while descending into the dark valley of trial, or while climbing the mountains of adversity are not the best conditions.  – Luther

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“The path of the righteous is level; you, the Upright One, make the way of the righteous smooth.”  (Isaiah 26:7, NIV)

While it is true that — externally — the path of the righteous is full of “ups and downs”; internally, at the seat of our heart and spirit, the path is bubble-center level for the person who faithfully follows the leading of the Spirit.

If we allow it, the external, visible, tangible, temporal, physical pressures of living will dictate our internal, invisible, intangible, eternal, spiritual perspective.  Don’t allow it.  In fact, turn it around so that your view of things visible is always informed, guided, and determined by things invisible.

It is the serenity that the “Upright One” alone provides that allows you to, as poet Rudyard Kipling wrote, “keep your head when all about you are losing theirs and blaming it on you.”  – Luther

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“You will guard him and keep him in perfect and constant peace whose mind [both its inclination and its character] is stayed on You, because he commits himself to You, leans on You, and hopes confidently in You.”  (Isaiah 26:3, Amplified Bible)

The Amplified translation is the version of the scriptures that never uses one word when three words will do; but its value is when we need to “turn up the volume” on scripture so that we may it’s voice more clearly.

As Rudyard Kipling wrote in his magnificent poem, “If. . .”: “If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs and blaming it on you. . . Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it. . .” *

The source of such peace is total and enduring trust in God.

Beware: There are many imitations of this peace but no substitutes; and many shortcuts to the end-state that Kipling describes. Don’t be fooled.  – Luther

* NOTE: If you are interested in reading the full text of Kipling’s poem, “If. . .”, I have provided it below: 

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too:
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or, being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise;

If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim,
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same:.
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build’em up with worn-out tools;

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings,
And never breathe a word about your loss:
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: “Hold on!”

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much:
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!

– Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936)

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