Tag Archives: the book of Genesis

“‘Here comes that dreamer!’,  they said to each other.   ‘Come now, let’s kill him and throw him into one of these cisterns and say that a ferocious animal devoured him.   Then we’ll see what comes of his dreams.’”   (Genesis 37:19-20, NIV)

The maltreatment of Joseph began with the evil plans of his brothers.

Joseph’s brothers resented Joseph on many levels: He was their father’s favorite son (and Joseph made no secret that he knew that his father’s favor rested on him); and Joseph made much of his dreams, in which he seemed always to be the hero.

The good news here is that God works on many levels, too.  Joseph’s circumstances were used by God to fit Joseph for God’s work; he used the brothers’ guilt to provoke confession and true repentance; and throughout, God was glorified for His love and His mercy.

Like Joseph, we do not know where life will take us; but we should never doubt that God is at work in our circumstances — however hopeless from our perspective — to transform us into the image of Christ; to bless others; and to glorify God.  If we are convinced of this, though we may fall down, we shall not stay down!  – Luther

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“God saw that human evil was out of control.  People thought evil, imagined evil — evil, evil, evil from morning to night.  God was sorry that he had made the human race in the first place; it broke his heart.”  (Genesis 6:5-6, The Message) 

God had made humans in His own image and after His likeness.  The potential for immense good was resident within every creature, and it broke God’s heart to see divine inspiration squandered, and human potential corrupted.  Yet, it was this apparent disregard of goodness, justice, and mercy by the very people that God had created, that He regretted having created us.  Moreover, God was about to hit the “reset” button on the world that He had called “good” at the dawn of Creation.

Yet, even in the midnight of divine reckoning, God does not extinguish the flickering hope of reconciliation.  In the case of today’s scripture, God’s immutable righteousness required the “reset”; as His unfathomable mercy allowed a “restart” through the faithful obedience of Noah and his family members.

God continues to seek us — even in our rebellion.  God continues to loves us — even with a broken heart.  How can we resist such love?  – Luther

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“The Lord had said to Abram, ‘Go from your country, your people and your father’s household to the land I will show you.'”  (Genesis 12:1, NIV)

This recollection of God’s first encounter with Abram (later called Abraham, the father of the faithful) reminds us that we must first “go” in obedience to God before God will “show” us the promise.

Most of us prefer it the other way round, as if to say to God: “Show me and I will go”; while God is saying to us, “Go and I will show you.”

It may be a strange thing to our family, friends, and neighbors to see us commit to something without being able to describe the end-state or the desired outcomes; but obedience ahead of evidence is how God dealt with Abram — and it is how God deals with us.

Whenever God’s spirit moves you to move — move! God will be with you every step of the way and, in time, you will see the promise.  – Luther

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