Tag Archives: Emmaus

“He asked them, ‘What are you discussing together as you walk along?’  They stood still, their faces downcast.”  (Luke 24:17, NIV)

The evidence of the Resurrection was not accepted by Jesus’ closest disciples.  In light of the empty tomb, the angel’s proclamation, the testimony of the women, the ancient prophecies come true, and even Jesus’ own words about His death and resurrection, one might think the disposition of the two disciples en route to Emmaus in today’s scripture would have been anything but “downcast,” but they were very distressed.

I am the first to admit that had I been there, I probably wouldn’t have believed,  either.  All of the disciples — except, to their eternal credit, the women — refused to accept the evidence of Jesus’ resurrection.  What they were seeing was unprecedented, and denial of the evidence is always the surest way to avoid facing the hard questions that inevitably follow Revelation.

Today, we still have the empty tomb, the angel’s proclamation, the testimony of the women, the ancient prophecies come true, and even Jesus’ own words about His death and resurrection and — unlike the two disciples on Resurrection Day — more than 2,000 additional years of testimony that all of it is still true!

Does your countenance reflect this compelling evidence?

The Lord is risen!  He is risen indeed!  Hallelujah!  – Luther

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“He asked them, ‘What are you discussing together as you walk along?’  They stood still, their faces downcast.”  (Luke 24:17, NIV)

The evidence of the Resurrection was not accepted by Jesus’ closest disciples.  In light of the empty tomb, the angel’s proclamation, the testimony of the women, the ancient prophecies come true, and even Jesus’ own words about His death and resurrection, one might think the disposition of the two disciples en route to Emmaus in today’s scripture would have been anything but “downcast,” but they were very distressed.

I am the first to admit that had I been there, I probably wouldn’t have believed,  either.  All of the disciples — except, to their eternal credit, the women — refused to accept the evidence of Jesus’ resurrection.  What they were seeing was unprecedented, and denial of the evidence is always the surest way to avoid facing the hard questions that inevitably follow Revelation.

Today, we still have the empty tomb, the angel’s proclamation, the testimony of the women, the ancient prophecies come true, and even Jesus’ own words about His death and resurrection and — unlike the two disciples on Resurrection Day — more than 2,000 additional years of testimony that all of it is still true!

Does your countenance reflect this compelling evidence?

The Lord is risen!  He is risen indeed!  Hallelujah!  – Luther

Tagged , ,

Resurrection Day +2

“He asked them, ‘What are you discussing together as you walk along?’ They stood still, their faces downcast.” (Luke 24:17, NIV)

The evidence of the Resurrection was not accepted by Jesus’ closest disciples. In light of the empty tomb, the angel’s proclamation, the testimony of the women, the ancient prophecies come true, and even Jesus’ own words about His death and resurrection, one might think the disposition of the two disciples en route to Emmaus in today’s scripture would have been anything but “downcast,” but they were very distressed.

I am the first to admit that had I been there, I also would not have believed.  All of the disciples — except, to their eternal credit, the women — refused to accept the evidence of Jesus’ resurrection.  What they were seeing was unprecedented, and denial of the evidence is always the surest way to avoid facing the hard questions that inevitably follow revelation or Revelation.

Today, we still have the empty tomb, the angel’s proclamation, the testimony of the women, the ancient prophecies come true, Jesus’ own words about His death and resurrection, and — unlike the two disciples on Resurrection Day — more than 2,000 additional years of testimony that all of it is still true!

Does your countenance reflect this compelling evidence?

He is risen!  The Lord is risen indeed!  Hallelujah!  – Luther

Tagged , , , ,
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